Thermal Management for Military Applications

Thermal Management for Military Applications

Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) play a crucial role in military devices, ensuring efficient heat transfer and dissipation from electronic components to maintain optimal operating temperatures. Military devices and applications’ thermal management needs are similar to those in other industries and are subject to the same technological advancements however, due to the nature of the industry additional considerations are required to maximise reliability. Military devices need to be able to withstand harsh environments and substances, be able to operate efficiently over a wide temperature range and resist deterioration, particularly around silicone outgassing for sensitive optical components. Choosing the right thermal modules is critical to ensure maximum reliability, performance and lifespan of the military device.

Importance of Thermal Management for Military Devices and Applications:

Device Performance and Longevity: Heat is a natural byproduct of electronic components’ operation. Excessive heat can degrade the performance of devices and shorten their lifespan. Maintaining an optimal operating temperature is essential for ensuring that these devices function reliably over an extended period.

Energy Efficiency: Heat generation can lead to increased energy consumption, reducing the energy efficiency of the device. Proper thermal management can help minimise heat-related power losses, ensuring that devices operate more efficiently and consume less power.

Data Accuracy: Many devices rely on sensors and transmitters that are sensitive to temperature changes. Elevated temperatures can cause inaccuracies in the data collected by these sensors, impacting the quality and reliability of medical systems.

User Safety: Excessive heat poses safety risks, overheating devices may malfunction leading to compromised performance or device shutdown, and in some cases may even become hazardous.

Military Devices RADAR

Radar Systems:

Radar stands for radio detection and ranging and is uses radio waves to detect and locate objects which are out of the range of vision. The concept of radar was derived from experiments on electromagnetic radiation in the late 19th century and by 1904 the first practical use of radar was used to detect ships in fog. Radar was developed as a military technology in the 1930s and a key breakthrough in radar design was the development of the cavity magnetron in 1940 which used high power microwaves to improve the resolution and range of radar systems. Radar technology has continued to advance and diversify and modern radar systems offer enhanced accuracy and range, systems include Pulse-Doppler Radar, Monopulse Radar and Phased-Array Radar. Military radars are used for a range of applications including surveillance, target tracking, air defence, identification, navigation and air traffic control. Radar systems are used throughout the military by the air force, army and navy and are found on ground bases, ships, aircraft and vehicles as well as man-portable systems which do not require a vehicle for transportation. Effective thermal management is crucial to ensure reliable performance of radar systems, TG-A1250LC Thermally Conductive Pad is a robust reinforced gap pad with an operating temperature range of -50˚C to +180˚C and thermal conductivity of 10w/mK which makes it ideal for use in demanding environments such as military radar systems.

Military Devices Night Vision Goggles

Night Vision Goggles:

Night vision technology has been an integral part of military operations for decades. Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) were first developed during World War II using infrared devices to amplify low levels of ambient light to enable users to see in near-total darkness, providing a significant tactical advantage. The technology has evolved significantly since then. Modern military Night Vision Goggles NVGs use various optoelectronic technologies to enhance visibility in low-light conditions, including incorporated thermal imaging, noise reduction and high resolution processing to enable soldiers to operate effectively in near-total darkness.  Modern NVGs continue to incorporate advancements in technology to improve their performance, durability, and compatibility with other military systems. Designs are smaller and more lightweight and may be mounted to helmets or scopes to ensuring enhanced capabilities for troops in various operational scenarios. Thermal management is required to enhance the performance and lifespan of components used in NVGs, this includes batteries, sensors, processors and display. TG-N800 is a silicone free thermally conductive putty which makes it ideal for use in optronics as it mitigates the risk of degradation of sensitive optical components from silicone outgassing. T68 Synthetic Graphite may be used in NVG displays thanks to its ultra light weight properties and excellent thermal conductivity of  1500 W/mK.

Military Devices Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle:

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones, have become integral to modern military operations, offering reconnaissance, surveillance, and tactical strike capabilities without the need for an onboard pilot as the operator controls the UAV remotely. UAVs are a relatively new technology for military applications and date back to the mid-20th century with the first article on UAVs published in Popular Mechanics in the 1940s. The first prototypes were called Prairie and Calera and were built in 1973 by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency using modified engines from lawnmowers. The two prototypes were able to carry a 13kg load and stayed airborne for 2 hours. UAV technology has developed significantly since then with the development of lighter glider style models of UAVs and the introduction of Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles (UCAVs) in the 1980s. Operation Desert Storm was the first conflict to report that a combat UAV was airborne at all times and nowadays drones form part of all military arsenals. Thermal management plays a vital role in the performance, reliability, and lifespan of military UAVs. Operating in extreme temperatures, such as scorching heat or freezing cold can negatively affect various components and onboard communication systems. There are several techniques for effective thermal management in surveillance drones, including active cooling systems such as Thermoelectric Cooling Chips, passive systems such as Heat Pipes and Phase Change Materials.

Why choose T-Global Technology?

Thermal management is a critical aspect of Military Device design and operation. Excess heat can lead to reduced performance, decreased longevity, compromised data accuracy or device failure. T-Global Technology provides a range of Thermal Management Products to help dissipate heat effectively and maintain optimal operating temperatures for various medical applications, ensuring the reliability and performance of these devices. Use the buttons below to view our full product range, contact us to request a sample or go back to the industry applications overview.

Military Surveillance Team

Thermal Management for Military Applications

Military devices and applications’ thermal management needs are similar to those in other industries and are subject to the same technological advancements however to due the nature of the industry additional considerations are required to maximise reliability. Military devices need to be able to withstand harsh environments and substances, be able to operate efficiently over a wide temperature range and resist deterioration, particularly around silicone outgassing. Choosing the right thermal modules ensures that devices and applications is critical to ensure maximum reliability, performance and lifespan of the device.

Importance of Thermal Management for Military Devices and Applications:

Device Performance and Longevity: Heat is a natural byproduct of electronic components’ operation. Excessive heat can degrade the performance of devices and shorten their lifespan. Maintaining an optimal operating temperature is essential for ensuring that these devices function reliably over an extended period.

Energy Efficiency: Heat generation can lead to increased energy consumption, reducing the energy efficiency of the device. Proper thermal management can help minimise heat-related power losses, ensuring that devices operate more efficiently and consume less power.

Data Accuracy: Many devices rely on sensors and transmitters that are sensitive to temperature changes. Elevated temperatures can cause inaccuracies in the data collected by these sensors, impacting the quality and reliability of medical systems.

User Safety: Excessive heat poses safety risks, overheating devices may malfunction leading to compromised performance or device shutdown, and in some cases may even become hazardous.

Radar Systems:

Radar stands for radio detection and ranging and it is uses radio waves to detect and locate objects which are out of the range of vision. The concept of radar was derived from experiments on electromagnetic radiation in the late 19th century and by 1904 the first practical use of radar was used to detect ships in fog. Radar was developed as a military technology in the 1930s and a key breakthrough in radar design was the development of the cavity magnetron in 1940 which used high power microwaves to improve the resolution and range of radar systems. Radar technology has continued to advance and diversify and modern radar systems offer enhanced accuracy and range, systems include Pulse-Doppler Radar, Monopulse Radar and Phased-Array Radar. Military radars are used for a range of applications including surveillance, target tracking, air defence, identification, navigation and air traffic control. Radar systems are used throughout the military by the air force, army and navy and are found on ground bases, ships, aircrafts and vehicles as well as man-portable systems which do not require a vehicle for transportation. Effective thermal management is crucial to ensure reliable performance of radar systems, TG-A1250LC Thermally Conductive Pad is a robust reinforced gap pad with an operating temperature range of -50˚C to +180˚C and thermal conductivity of 10w/mK which makes it ideal for use in demanding environments such as military radar systems.

Military Devices RADAR

Night Vision Goggles:

Night vision technology has been an integral part of military operations for decades. Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) were first developed during World War II using infrared devices to amplify low levels of ambient light to enable users to see in near-total darkness, providing a significant tactical advantage. The technology has evolved significantly since then. Modern military Night Vision Goggles NVGs use various optoelectronic technologies to enhance visibility in low-light conditions, including incorporated thermal imaging, noise reduction and high resolution processing to enable soldiers to operate effectively in near-total darkness.  Modern NVGs continue to incorporate advancements in technology to improve their performance, durability, and compatibility with other military systems. Designs are smaller and more lightweight and may be mounted to helmets or scopes to ensuring enhanced capabilities for troops in various operational scenarios. Thermal management is required to enhance the performance and lifespan of components used in NVGs, this includes batteries, sensors, processors and display. TG-N800 is a silicone free thermally conductive putty which makes it ideal for use in optronics as it mitigates the risk of degradation of sensitive optical components from silicone outgassing. T68 Synthetic Graphite may be used in NVG displays thanks to its ultra light weight properties and excellent thermal conductivity of  1500 W/mK.

Military Devices Night Vision Goggles

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle:

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones, have become integral to modern military operations, offering reconnaissance, surveillance, and tactical strike capabilities without the need for an onboard pilot as the operator controls the UAV remotely. UAVs are a relatively new technology for military applications and date back to the mid-20th century with the first article on UAVs published in Popular Mechanics in the 1940s. The first prototypes were called Prairie and Calera and were built in 1973 by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency using modified engines from lawnmowers. The two prototypes were able to carry a 13kg load and stayed airborne for 2 hours. UAV technology has developed significantly since then with the development of lighter glider style models of UAVs and the introduction of Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles (UCAVs) in the 1980s. Operation Desert Storm was the first conflict to report that a combat UAV was airborne at all times and nowadays drones form part of all military arsenals. Thermal management plays a vital role in the performance, reliability, and lifespan of military UAVs. Operating in extreme temperatures, such as scorching heat or freezing cold can negatively affect various components and onboard communication systems. There are several techniques for effective thermal management in surveillance drones, including active cooling systems such as Thermoelectric Cooling Chips, passive systems such as Heat Pipes and Phase Change Materials.

Military Devices Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Why choose T-Global Technology?

Thermal management is a critical aspect of Military Device design and operation. Excess heat can lead to reduced performance, decreased longevity, compromised data accuracy or device failure. T-Global Technology provides a range of Thermal Management Products to help dissipate heat effectively and maintain optimal operating temperatures for various medical applications, ensuring the reliability and performance of these devices. Use the buttons below to view our full product range, contact us to request a sample or go back to the industry applications overview.

Military Surveillance Team